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DOMESTIC VIOLENCE INFORMATION

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE FACTS:

  • Domestic violence is the willful intimidation, assault, battery, sexual assault, and/or other abusive behavior perpetrated by an intimate partner against another.
     
  • It is an epidemic affecting individuals in every community, regardless of age, economic status, race, religion, nationality, or educational background.
     
  • Violence against women is often accompanied by emotionally abusive and controlling behavior, and thus is part of a systematic pattern of dominance and control.
     
  • Domestic violence results in physical injury, psychological trauma, and sometimes death.
     
  • The consequences of domestic violence can cross generations and truly last a lifetime.
     
  • 1 in every 4 women will experience domestic violence in their lifetime.
     
  • 1 in 6 women have experienced an attempted or completed rape.
     
  • An estimated 1.3 million women are victims of physical assault by an intimate partner each year.
     
  • Almost one-third of female homicide victims that are reported in police records are killed by an intimate partner.
     
  • Boys who witness domestic violence are twice as likely to abuse their own partners and children when they become adults.
     


ARE YOU AFRAID OF SOMEONE YOU LOVE?

Many victims of domestic abuse use these phrases to describe their experiences. The following list was designed to help you evaluate the level of abuse you are experiencing in a relationship. It includes emotional, financial, physical, and sexual abuse.

Does your partner:
  • Frequently blame or criticize you or your family?
  • Blame you for “causing” the abuse?
  • Abuse animals?
  • Keep you from doing things you want to do, like seeing family and friends, or going to work or school?
  • Withhold approval, affection or sex?
  • Threaten to have you deported?
  • Get angry if something is not done to his/her liking?
  • Get angry if you pay attention to someone or something else?
  • Not allow you to sleep?
  • Take away car keys, phone, money, or credit cards?
  • Threaten to leave or tell you to leave?
  • Tell people that you are crazy?
  • Frequently check up on you?
  • Threaten to commit suicide if you leave?
  • Embarrass you in front of others?
  • Minimize or deny being abusive?
  • Abuse your children?
  • Use drugs or alcohol to excuse his/her behavior?
  • Control the bank accounts, credit cards, cash, etc.?
  • Refuse to put your name on joint assets?
  • Refuse to let you work?
  • Refuse to work or pay bills?
  • Cause you to lose your job?
  • Pressure or force you to have sex or do something that makes you uncomfortable or hurt?
  • Accuse you of having sex or wanting to have sex with others?
  • Use your children to relay negative messages or to report on you?
  • Threaten to take custody of or kidnap your children?
  • Threaten to make false reports to DCFS about you?
  • Push, grab, shove, slap or punch you?
  • Kick, choke or bite you?
  • Tie you up, physically restrain you, or prevent you from leaving an area?
  • Threaten you with a gun or other weapon?
  • Throw objects around or destroy property?
If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, or are concerned about the level of abuse you are experiencing, please talk with someone who understands.

EFFECTS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ON CHILDREN

Violence can negatively impact children in more ways than adults may think. Whether the violence is seen, heard, or experienced, it impacts the health and sense of well being of children.

WHEN A MOTHER IS ABUSED, HER CHILDREN ARE ALSO AFFECTED:

  • Children see it, hear it, and sense it (even if they are not in the same room when the abuse is occurring)
  • Children feel confusion, stress, and fear
  • Children feel guilty that they can’t protect their mother, or that they may be the cause of the fight
  • Children are more likely to grow up to repeat the destructive relationship patterns they see in their early lives
  • Children may also be abused, or they may be neglected while their mother attempts to deal with her own trauma

Sometimes very subtle forms of violence can have a lasting impact on children and their behavior. Such experiences can be devastating and difficult for them to deal with on their own. 

REACTIONS THAT CHILDREN FROM VIOLENT HOMES ARE LIKELY TO SHOW:

  • Sudden changes in sleep habits - bedwetting, nightmares, fear of sleeping alone
  • Physical complaints – headache, stomachache, nausea
  • Crying or whining, clinging, needing excessive adult attention
  • Easily startled, afraid of things they were never afraid of before
  • Displays violent, aggressive, disruptive, or bullying behavior
  • Drop in school performance
  • Withdraws from friends or favorite activities
  • Poor attention span, distractibility
WHAT TO DO IF YOUR CHILD HAS BEEN EXPOSED TO VIOLENCE:
  • Reassure your child that he/she is safe
  • Explain to your child that he/she is not to blame for the violence
  • Encourage your child to express his/her feelings
  • Reach out for professional help

If children live in a violent home, they learn violence. Seek professional services to reduce the effects of violence on children.

For Help, Call:
Hanover Park Police Social Services: (630) 823-5579
Safe From The Start (kids ages 0 – 5): (630) 540-0549
Community Crisis Center, Cook County: (847) 697-2380
Family Shelter Service, DuPage County: (630) 469-5650


 
OTHER DOMESTIC VIOLENCE INFORMATION

Click on the links below for furher information on the following:


Safety Plan

IDVA Booklets

Order of Protection Brochure

Info Sheet on Order of Protection

Victim Resources

Domestic Violence Brochure

Assess Abuse




For further information and referrals on Domestic Violence contact our Social Service Office, Tricia Rossi, at 630-823-5579.